While everything in the universe strives for chaos, man is constantly trying to bring order. We want to explain, to understand. But most of the ideologies and structures that once helped us find our bearings have been abandoned, as they were too restrictive to serve as guideposts. What is left for us now?

The new Panama Pictures production The Man who fell from the sky captures this collective sense of directionlessness and dislocation. The performers look like they have been washed ashore. High in the air they hang from the branches of an uprooted tree, balancing on moving platforms. Is this the aftermath of a disaster? The harbinger of a great change?

The Man who fell from the sky shows the human being who, without a foothold or compass, must relate to an environment that is subject to change.

For The man who fell from the sky, Panama Pictures intertwines dance, aerial and floor acrobatics, and live music to create a penetrating and poetic series of images with great physicality, in which the strength and vulnerability of the human body are paramount. With a mix of guitar, voice and electronics, musician Budy Mokoginta creates a solid sound that propels the whole, colours it and dislocates it at times.